Road Trip Stop to Crazy Horse

“Never Forget Your Dreams”  – Korczak Ziolkowski

Heading out West for a road trip to Yellowstone was more than the 40+ hour round trip adventure as stated on google maps.  With all the rest stops and additional sights to see, it was more like 50+ hours of rubber meets the road and camera finds a cure.  That cure would be found in clicking the camera taking images of historical sights and breathtaking landscapes that released the creativity inside of me. (All photographs on this web site are  (c) Photos by Martina, unless stated otherwise.)

Major road trip stop one:

Reaching the Black Hills of South Dakota seemed like forever, yet the destination to see Crazy Horse was like a dream come true.  The granite sculpture in the background is the world’s largest working sculpture in progress.  Blasting of the rocks can sometimes be seen by visitors. The white carving is a model that the sculptor, Korczak used to help map out the stone carving. This memorial is open all year long.

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The quote below the statue says ” My lands are where my dead lie buried.” – Crazy Horse 1877

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A closer look at the Crazy Horse carving

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A traditional Indian dance

Lakota Chief Henry Standing Bear actually chose the main sculptor who also worked on Mt. Rushmore, only 17 miles away, to carve the Crazy Horse Memorial. Lakota wanted to show that the red man had great heroes too.  In order to pay tribute to the Native Americans whose legacy was important to the world, the Chief discovered and selected Korczak to help him. The sculptor dedicated 36 years working on the mountain rock memorial. His children are still a big part of organizing the Foundation. Interesting fact is that the sculptor, Mr. Korczak Ziolkowski, lived on the East coast in Hartford, Connecticut where he built a 13 foot model of what was to be the Crazy Horse Memorial. He never accepted Goverment funding.

 

More information on Crazy horse can be found at: Crazy Horse of South Dakota

This message was found on a postcard, as I quote:

  • When the course of history has been told
  • Let these truths here carved be known:
  • Conscience dictates civilizations live
  • And duty ours to place before the world,
  • A chronicle which will long endure.
  • For like things under us and beyond
  • Inevitably we must pass into oblivion.
  • This land of refuge to the stranger
  • Was ours for countless eons before:
  • Civilizations majestic and mighty.
  • Our gifts were many which we shared
  • And gratitute for them was known.
  • But later, givien my oppressed ones
  • Were murder, rape and sanguine war.
  • Looking east from whence invaders came,
  • Greedy usurpers of our heritage.
  • For us the past is in our hearts,
  • The future never to be fulfilled.
  • To you I give this granite epic
  • For your descendants to always know –
  • “My lands are where my dead lie buried.”

 

About Martina Landolt Photography

Being outside in nature, capturing the beauty that lives among us, on camera or in the mind's eye has healing powers. Having fun discovering new and interesting subjects from unique perspectives to unique lenses, photography is all about light. Natural light is a constant change creating photo challenges that are never ending. I am on a photographic journey of life with people and places around me. Thank you for visiting my journey. Please leave any comments & connect with me on Facebook, twitter or LinkedIn.
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